Voter Watchdog Group Claims Nearly 400 Dead People Remain on Voter Rolls

(RALEIGH) – The Voter Integrity Project is demanding the Wake County Board of Elections clear its voter rolls of 386 deceased citizens. The group says it matched the voter rolls against the same official death records the state Department of Health and Human Services provides to the State Board of Elections each month.

“North Carolina election law mandates a monthly process for election officials to remove the dead people from the rolls,” says project spokesman Jay DeLancy. “One of the big loopholes in our fraud-friendly election laws is that nobody is held accountable if it doesn’t get done,” he says.

Voter Integrity Project research director John Pizzo says he found similar problems in 2010 in Congressional District 13, which includes Wake County. Pizzo says the election officials were notified and given the names of the deceased found on the rolls then. His team was surprised to find 74 of the names of the deseased given the officials were still on the rolls two years later.

“There may be some other explanation,” says Pizzo, “and I would be interested in hearing it, but I’m beginning to think somebody in that office dropped the ball.”

Volunteers working with the Voter Integrity Project filed similar challenges in two other counties. They notified the Alamance County Board of Elections about 123 names of dead people still on the rolls. Volunteers came up with 77 deceased citizens on the rolls in Halifax County. Similar challenges could be filed in other counties in the coming weeks.

SC Attorney General: Hundreds of Dead Citizens Have Voted in Recent Elections

According to South Carolina’s Republican Attorney General,  recent South Carolina elections have featured hundreds of dead citizens voting. From the AP:

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) – South Carolina’s attorney general has notified the U.S. Justice Department of potential voter fraud.

Attorney General Alan Wilson sent details of an analysis by the Department of Motor Vehicles to U.S. Attorney Bill Nettles.

In a letter dated Thursday, Wilson says the analysis found 953 ballots cast by voters listed as dead. In 71 percent of those cases, ballots were cast between two months and 76 months after the people died. That means they “voted” up to 6 1/3 years after their death.

The letter doesn’t say in which elections the ballots were cast.

The analysis came out of research for the state’s new voter identification law. The U.S. Justice Department denied clearance of that law.

Wilson told Nettles he asked the State Law Enforcement Division to investigate.

This follows an explosive video from New Hampshire which demonstrated the ease with which potential voter fraud can occur without voter ID.

But remember folks-Voter ID requirements are a solution in search of a problem.

People of NC Agree with Voter Photo ID – AGAIN!

A recent poll out of Elon University confirms that North Carolinians “overwhelmingly support” voter photo ID legislation.  According to the News and Observer, “The Elon University Poll found that 75 percent support voter ID provisions in a bill being considered in the legislature and 80 percent think it is fair.”

The Elon poll corroborates Civitas Institute polls that consistently reveal huge support for voter photo ID.  In the December 2010 Civitas poll, 84 percent of respondents supported the idea. The breakdown of the Civitas Poll shows 96 percent Republicans, 86 percent unaffiliated voters and 73 percent of Democrats support a voter photo ID.  The breakdown further reveals that 89 percent of white voters and 68 percent of African-American voters support voter photo ID.  Civitas Polls and Elon University Polls differ in that Civitas only polls registered voters while Elon polls residents of North Carolina.

While opponents, extremely liberal groups (including the State Board of Elections and mainstream media outlets), want everyone to believe this is a partisan and racist issue, the people of North Carolina know better. The people of our State know that it only makes sense (C O M M O N – S E N S E) to ask someone for a photo ID before giving them a ballot.